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The healthmatters blog; commentary, observation and review

Government plan for new treatments welcomed by Alzheimer’s Research UK

Posted by on Nov 3, 2017 in Blog, NHS | 0 comments

Alzheimer’s Research UK, the UK’s leading dementia research charity, has welcomed a government plan to speed up the way new treatments are introduced on the NHS. The plan takes forward several recommendations from last year’s Accelerated Access Review – which examined how advances in medicine could be made available to patients faster – and could have major implications for future dementia treatments.

Among the actions announced is the creation of a new ‘Accelerated Access Pathway’ for selected breakthrough treatments and medical technologies that fill an unmet need, transform patients’ lives or dramatically improve efficiency. This pathway would streamline the regulatory process to allow these treatments to be made available up to four years earlier – but the report warns that any new medicines leading to increased costs for the NHS would need to be offset by other, cost-saving treatments. Meanwhile, companies would also be expected to offer new treatments and technologies to the NHS at the best possible value for money.

Hilary Evans, Chief Executive of Alzheimer’s Research UK, said:
“Today’s announcement marks a real step in the right direction and could have major implications for people with dementia. With no treatments yet available to stop or slow the diseases that cause dementia, there is a huge unmet need, and we hope the approach announced today will ensure that people with dementia will not have to wait for medical advances to reach them. The ambitions outlined today have the potential to transform the way breakthrough treatments are delivered to the people who need them, and it’s vital that their views are at the centre of any decision-making about which treatments are classed as ‘breakthrough’.

“We recognise that new treatments for dementia could pose a challenge for NHS budgets, so early discussions between the NHS and drug companies will be crucial to allow our health services to plan ahead. At Alzheimer’s Research UK it’s our mission to bring about the first life-changing treatment for dementia by 2025, which is why we will be working to support these discussions and develop solutions to this challenge.”

AbbVie puts creativity at heart of health problem-solving with unique group of experts including animators and gamers  

Posted by on Oct 30, 2017 in Blog, Public Health | 0 comments

Today, global research-based biopharmaceutical company, AbbVie, is announcing a unique line-up of experts from the creative, health and tech industries, including Aardman (the studio behind Wallace & Gromit and Shaun the Sheep). The experts, who are part of the Live:LabTM project, have been brought together to tackle the complex health issue of the ‘Fear of Finding Out’ (FOFO) – a major psychological barrier which prevents people from seeking medical advice when they have worrying symptoms[iii].

Former Health Minister, Alan Milburn, is chairing the group of Live:LabTM collaborators who comprise filmmakers, animators, gamers, data specialists and health experts – with the likes of award-winninggame designers Glitchers, medical virtual reality experts FundamentalVR, the Open Data Institute, Professor Sir Muir Gray and TV doctor Dr Zoe Williams, joining the line-up.

The experts will draw on their experience on the power of storytelling and characters, the benefits of data and tech, and real-life medical experience. The aim is to create a positive new approach to help the public and NHS to overcome barriers that stop people coming forward for early diagnosis and treatment.

A new short film is being released today, documenting the Live:LabTM collaborators meeting to discuss ways new technologies and data collection can revolutionise our approach tackling barriers to health.

 

Studies show that addressing concerns in middle age can double individuals’ chances of being healthy when you are 70[iv]. Live:Lab’sTM aim is to help people feel positive and empowered to take control of their own health and wellbeing, which in turn will help them to overcome the barriers that prevent them from seeking health advice and delay diagnosis. Live:LabTM complements NHS England’s ‘Five Year Forward View’ by focusing on improving health prevention, supporting a more sustainable NHS.[v] Never before has the ‘Fear of Finding Out’ been addressed by such a broad range of experts, collectively.

Speaking about the project Live:LabTM collaborator, Sir Muir Gray CBE, said: “We’re increasingly seeing evidence which shows that people respond far better to positive health messages, which in turn means they are more likely to engage with the health service. I’m a firm believer that healthcare is what you do for yourself and through the work we’re doing with Live:LabTM, we’re hoping to devise a solution which will help people feel empowered and in control of their health and wellbeing.”

Heather Wright, Executive Producer and Head of Partner Content at Aardman and Live:LabTMcollaborator, comments: “I am passionate about the NHS and I was a little surprised that a major pharmaceutical company, like AbbVie, would want to look outside the industry for answers and explore the territory of preventative health. I was even more surprised when I first learnt about who else is part of Live:LabTM – from game developers, to tech experts. The aspirations for Live:LabTM, such as breaking down barriers to form progressive partnerships to support the NHS, are something I really respect. I feel we have the potential to help make a real change to healthcare.”

Jérôme Bouyer, AbbVie General Manager, commented: “As an innovation led science company we, and in fact healthcare organisations more widely, are used to thinking in terms of logic and evidence. We come at problems from the world of fact based evidence. But life experience shows that we’re not always logical in how we think about our own health. The decisions we make have a big impact on what help we can get from doctors. If we are going relieve the huge strain on the NHS, we must get creative and we can only do this by bringing in the most creative minds from outside of healthcare. This is what AbbVie is trying to encourage through this collaboration.”

The Live:LabTM collaborators are:

  • Rt Hon Alan Milburn – former Secretary of State for Health
  • Simon Bullmore, Open Data Institute – a non-profit company with a mission to inspire people to innovate with data
  • Julia Manning, Chief Executive, 2020health – an independent, social enterprise think tank whose mission is to ‘make health personal’
  • Aardman – world leading and multi-award winning British studio which produces series, advertising, interactive entertainment, attractions and feature films; like Wallace & Gromit andShaun the Sheep
  • Glitchers – a company creating innovative gaming products including Sea Hero Quest, an award-winning mobile and virtual reality game which collects spatial navigation data to inform dementia research
  • Professor Sir Muir Gray – founder of the National Library for Health and the first person to hold the post of Chief Knowledge Officer of the NHS
  • Dr Zoe Williams – media medic, GP and clinical champion for the RCGP’s clinical priority ‘Physical Activity and Lifestyle’
  • Dr Carmen Lefevre – research associate and research lead at the UCL Centre for Behaviour Change
  • Alison Hardy – health behaviour change expert and founder of Headstrong Thinking
  • Fundamental VR – medical VR simulation specialist that delivers virtual reality haptic ‘flight simulators’ for surgery
  • Dr Angel Chater – chartered psychologist, and a reader in Health Psychology and Behaviour Change at the University of Bedfordshire
  • Chrissie Wellington OBE – Global Head of Health & Wellbeing, Parkrun, and British triathlete
  • Daniel Hulme, CEO of Satalia – a company pushing the boundaries of data science, optimisation and artificial intelligence to solve the most difficult problems in industry

 

Further background on all of the collaborators can be found on the Live:LabTM website, which is also where the second short film in the Live:Lab TM series an be viewed.

i) Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME). GBD Compare – Public Health England. Seattle, WA: IHME, University of Washington, 2015. Available at: http://vizhub.healthdata.org/gbd-compare [Last Accessed: 11 February 2016]

[ii] 2020health: The Fear of Finding Out – Identifying psychological barriers to symptom presentation and diagnosis in the UK. 2017. Available at http://www.2020health.org/2020health

[iii] 2020health: The Fear of Finding Out – Identifying psychological barriers to symptom presentation and diagnosis in the UK. 2017. Available at http://www.2020health.org/2020health

[iv] Lang, I. A., et al. (2012). Healthy Behaviours in Middle Age and Long-Term Consequences for Mortality, Physical and Cognitive Function, and Mental Health. J Epidemiol Community Health. 66:A1-A66

[v] NHS England. Five Year Forward View. Available at: https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/5yfv-web.pdf [Last Accessed: April 2017]

[vi] Dryden, R. et al., 2012 What do we know about who does and does not attend general health checks? Findings from a narrative scoping review. BMC Public Health 2012, 12:723

[vii] Public Health England – Modern life responsible for ‘worrying’ health in middle aged’. Available at:https://www.gov.uk/government/news/modern-life-responsible-for-worrying-health-in-middle-aged [Accessed Jan 2017)

[viii] Public Health England – Living healthily in midlife can double your chances of being healthy at 70 and beyond. Available at:https://www.gov.uk/government/news/phe-launches-one-you [Accessed Jan 2017].

Mental Health Network welcomes findings of Stevenson-Farmer independent review into workplace mental health

Posted by on Oct 26, 2017 in Blog, Public Health | 0 comments

Responding to the Stevenson-Farmer independent review into workplace mental health, Sean Duggan, Chief Executive of the Mental Health Network, which is part of the NHS Confederation, said:

 “We welcome this report’s approach to prioritising the mental health of the workforce and keeping mental health high on the healthcare agenda.
“Key to alleviating some of the pressures we are currently seeing within the mental health sector is the support offered to individuals before they reach crisis. Empowering employees to look after their own mental health is a crucial step towards this.
“The evidence shows that improving employee mental health is both beneficial to the individual and good for business, paying dividends in terms of morale, retention and productivity.
“The NHS has made great progress in this area. For example, the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust has introduced several initiatives as part of its happier@work project.
“This programme includes workshops on mental health awareness; skills workshops for managers; and practical skills for peace of mind, managing wellbeing and stress awareness.

“The more support the Government offers to spread these types of initiatives, the better.”

Happiness Can Be a Factor in Stroke Danger, says Leading US Doctor

Posted by on Oct 26, 2017 in Blog, Public Health | 0 comments

Stroke claims an estimated 6.2 million lives globally each year: World Stroke Organization

How happy we are can have a long-term impact on our risk of suffering a stroke, a leading US-based doctor has said ahead of World Stroke Day activities on Sunday, October 29.

Andrew Russman, D.O., Head of the Stroke Program and Medical Director of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at the Cleveland Clinic, says emotional wellbeing is often a deciding factor in whether we make healthy or unhealthy lifestyle choices. Even mild stress or feelings of unhappiness can lead to major health incidents.

“If we look at stress, as a prime example, people will very often deal with the emotional upset by making bad lifestyle choices, such as increased smoking or alcohol use, or eating junk food,” said Dr. Russman. “That leads to obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, all coming together as a significant increase in our risk of stroke.”

A stroke occurs when there is a problem getting blood to the brain, either because of a blockage or a ruptured blood vessel. When this happens, the brain does not get enough oxygen, causing brain cells to die. Stroke claims an estimated 6.2 million lives globally each year, according to the World Stroke Organization, more than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. It is also a leading cause of disability.

A number of factors increase the risk of stroke:

  • Excess weight — Obesity can lead to heart disease and high cholesterol, which can lead to a stroke.
  • Heart problems — Strokes are six times more likely to occur in people with cardiovascular disease. Atrial fibrillation, one of the most common heart rhythm problems, increases your risk of stroke by about five times.
  • High blood pressure — Strokes are four to six times more likely in people with hypertension.
  • High cholesterol — People with high cholesterol are at double the risk of having a stroke.
  • Heavy drinking — This increases the risk for stroke and cardiovascular disease.
  • Smoking — If you smoke, you double your risk for stroke compared to nonsmokers.

Dr. Russman says that while specific data on the impact of mental or emotional health on the likelihood of stroke is limited, research is emerging that shows a link. One Japanese study published earlier this year used unemployment as commonly identifiable sign that someone had experienced a period of high personal stress, and analyzed the histories of around 40,000 men and women aged 40 to 59 years.

“The results showed a clear correlation between the stress caused by job loss, and increased smoking, alcohol use, high blood pressure and diabetes, and ultimately to an increase proportion that suffered a stroke,” said Dr. Russman. “This didn’t only apply to those who experienced long-term or multiple periods of unemployement. Even just one incident of job loss increased the risk.”

When a person does experience a stroke, being able to recognize the signs can greatly increase the odds of a better outcome. Time is critical, and time saved can make the difference that allows a person to walk again, or to go home instead of going into a nursing home.

Some people will experience warning signs before a stroke occurs, which is called an ischemic attack, or a mini stroke.

To check for signs of a stroke, and to respond appropriately, always remember the words ‘BE FAST’:

B = Balance – Is the person having trouble with balance?
E = Eyes – Is the person having visual problems?
F = Face – Is there droopiness in the face?
A = Arms – Is there any weakness in the arms or legs?
S = Speech – Is the person having difficulty speaking?
T = Time – Time to call for an ambulance.

World Stroke Day is observed on October 29 each year, and is an initiative of the World Stroke Organization. It aims to underscore the serious nature and high rates of stroke, raise awareness of the prevention and treatment of the condition, and ensure better care and support for survivors.

Posted by on Oct 25, 2017 in Blog, NHS | 0 comments

Cutting corners, spoiling lives?

Child and adolescent health services have been having a very hard time over the last few years, with referrals exceeding staff capacity, a shortage of in-patient beds and transfer of young people with severe mental illnesses or behaviour problems to distant units for care. The commercial sector has been involved in children’s mental health service provision, just as in learning disability and adult psychiatry, and the results have too often been ugly.

The HSJ broke the news on October 24th that a third private sector operated children’s mental health unit – Watcombe Hall in Torquay, run by the Huntercombe Group – had closed during a CQC inspection. It has now closed indefinitely after several safeguarding inquiries were launched. Torbay Hospital raised the alarm about young people with malnutrition and dehydration being admitted from the unit.

Watcombe Hall is the third privately run children’s mental health unit to close. The other two other units, both run by Cygnet Health Care, have subsequently reopened. The CQC report on Watcombe Hall highlighted:

  • Patients’ physical health was not always checked – one patient had not eaten or drunk for four days.
  • Weighing of patients with eating disorders did not always follow medical instructions.
  • Staff had not received specific training in caring for young people with eating disorders.
  • A group of three young people overpowered staff before absconding from the unit.
  • There was a high level of serious incidents, including 18 in the first three months of 2017, as well as 38 staff injuries in six months.
  • Four patients were restrained 29 times or more during their stay on the unit.
  • Staff turnover affected care quality and new staff were not adequately trained, inducted and supervised. Only half of staff had up to date safeguarding level three training despite this being mandatory.
  • Some young people had not engaged in any activities for three months and use of outside areas and the gym was very limited.
  • Inspectors saw a young person climb a fence and abscond, during the CQC inspection.

 

Muddling along?

 

NHS hospitals could carry out 280,000 more non-emergency operations a year by organising operating theatre schedules better, according to a study in 100 NHS Trusts conducted by NHS Improvement, that was leaked to the BBC on October 24th. The research, using data from 2016, found more than two hours were wasted each day on the average operating list. The study says avoidable factors like late starts led to the loss of time.

Ex A&E doctor Chris McCullough, CEO and Co-Founder of Rotageek has a few things to say on this matter.  “The real issue, not mentioned in this study, is one of ineffective use of data to schedule and manage hospital resources. Hospitals are run at such high capacity that operations are actually often delayed until managers know they have a bed available for patients arriving for surgery. Ready-to-start surgical teams cannot start a procedure by anaesthetising patients until a bed has been allocated. In turn, this won’t happen until the ward medical team have created space by seeing all patients and sent people home. As a result, operations start later than planned and waste theatre capacity.

“The only way to solve this crisis is for the NHS to use the data it already has available to better manage and predict hospital capacity and patient flow – impacted by variables such as the quantity and condition of patients, available staff and their skillset, as well as medical resources.

“By analysing the flow and pattern of patients, from admittance to surgery through to final discharge, hospitals can predict the effect of any scenario on each individual hospital department and the system as a whole. This simulation offers several benefits; it can monitor hospital operations, predict future bottleneck days or weeks, diagnose where and what could be done to avoid or fix problems, and it can assess where more staff are needed to help plan for accurate hiring.

At the moment, the NHS is forced to be reactive to scheduling when it could actually be much more proactive. Management can only see a problem when it’s too late, as they are unable to make sense of all the moving components within the system. This means it is impossible to have certainty over where to make real efficiencies, let alone anticipate capacity problems in real-time for elective patients.”

News from Nowhere’s moles agree, and ask: why haven’t all hospitals sorted this, it is not a new story?

 

A&E attendances, not as rushed as some say?

On 17th October the Care Quality Commission (CQC) published the results of the Emergency Department Survey 2016, co-ordinated by the Picker Institute. The survey was ; a nation-wide survey of more than 40,000 people who attended emergency and urgent care departments, which sought to understand their experiences. The results suggest that most patients have a positive experience when it comes to interactions with NHS doctors and nurses, despite a marked increase in the numbers attending NHS Emergency Departments in recent years.

The years between 2005/6 and 2015/6 have seen an increase in emergency department attendance of 10%; this equates to over one million additional people attending the departments in 2016 than 2006.

The survey included people who attended one of 137 acute and specialist NHS trusts during September 2016, and is part of the National Patient Survey Programme (NPSP) managed by the Survey Coordination Centre, based at Picker. Despite the increasing number of attendees to emergency departments, 73% of patients said they definitely had enough time to discuss their condition with a doctor or nurse. In addition, 78% of these reported that their doctors and nurses listened to what they had to say.

Only 69% of patients reported that their doctor or nurse explained the nature of their condition and treatment in a way that they could understand. Three quarters (75%) of respondents “definitely” had confidence in their doctors and nurses, with a further 18% having confidence in them to a certain degree.

The survey highlighted problem that arose when patients left the department or unit; 30% of respondents weren’t given enough information about danger signs  watch out for on returning home; and 37% were not given enough information about what medication side-effects they should watch out for. About 45% of respondents stated that their home situation was not taken into account when they left the emergency department, and 34% were not informed about when they could resume normal activities, such as driving.

A caveat from Health Matters: The 2016 survey of emergency departments involved 137 acute and specialist NHS trusts with a Type 1 accident and emergency department.  Type 1 departments are consultant-led A&E departments with full resuscitation facilities operating 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Forty nine of these trusts also had direct responsibility for running a Type 3 department and patients from these departments were included within the survey for the first time in 2016. Type 3 departments are minor injury units and urgent care centres that treat patients for minor injuries and illnesses, and which can be doctor or nurse led.

COMMUTING AND EMPLOYEE WELLBEING

Posted by on Oct 24, 2017 in Blog, Public Health | 0 comments

COMMUTING AND EMPLOYEE WELLBEING

Kiron Chatterjee and Ben Clark of the Centre for Transport & Society at UWE Bristol explain the findings from their ESRC study of Commuting and Wellbeing.

Many of us spend longer commuting to work than we would like and find our journeys stressful, but how detrimental is commuting to our wellbeing?

The journey to and from work is a routine activity undertaken on about 160 days of the year by those who are full-time employed in England. The average one-way commute time is 30 minutes, hence commuting consumes about one hour per day for the average commuter. However, one in seven commuters has a commute time of one hour or more, spending at least two hours per day commuting.

The impact of commuting on wellbeing has been studied before, but results have been inconclusive and we do not have a complete picture of how commuting affects different aspects of wellbeing.

Our study, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, took advantage of Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study which tracks the lives of a large, representative sample of households in England. The data set allowed us to examine how changes in different aspects of wellbeing from one year to the next were related to changing commuting circumstances for more than 26,000 workers in England over a five-year period.

As set out in our summary report, we found that, all else being equal, every extra minute of commuting time reduces job satisfaction, reduces leisure time satisfaction, increases strain in people’s lives and worsens mental health.

The graph below shows job satisfaction (as measured on a 7-point scale) declines with commute time. Interestingly, the exception is the small proportion of workers with extreme commutes of over 90 minutes each way.

 

The effects of commuting on employee wellbeing were found to vary depending on the mode of transport used to get to work:

  1. Those who walk or cycle to work do not report reductions in leisure time satisfaction in the same way as other commuters, even with the same duration of commute. Presumably, active commuting is seen as a beneficial use of time.
  2. Bus commuters feel the negative impacts of longer journey times more strongly than users of other modes of transport. This could relate to the complexity of longer journeys by bus.
  3. Meanwhile, longer duration commutes by rail are associated with less strain than shorter commutes by rail. We think this is explained by those on longer rail journeys being more likely to get a seat and to have comfortable conditions to relax or even to work.
  4. Those who work from home are found to have higher job satisfaction and leisure time satisfaction, but working from home is clearly not possible for everyone on a daily basis.

Our findings have particularly important implications for employers.  An additional 20 minutes of commuting each day was found (on average) to have the equivalent effect on job satisfaction as a 19% reduction in income – this is a loss of £4,080 per annum for someone earning £21,600 (the median value for our sample).  We found a gender difference for this result with longer commute times having a more negative impact on women’s job satisfaction than men’s. This is likely to be related to the greater household and family responsibilities that women tend to have. We also found that employees with longer commute times are more likely to change job, and this has implications for employee retention.

The overall message for employers is that job satisfaction can be improved if workers have opportunities to reduce their time spent commuting, to work from home, and/or to walk or cycle to work – such commuting opportunities are likely to be good news for employee wellbeing and retention and hence reduce costs to businesses.

While we found that longer commute times have adverse wellbeing effects for job satisfaction, and even more markedly for leisure time satisfaction, they were not found to have a large impact on life satisfaction overall. Our analysis showed that this is because longer commute times are taken on for jobs which provide higher salaries and other benefits which serve to increase life satisfaction.

 

This does not mean that the negative wellbeing impacts of longer commutes can be disregarded. It is important to recognise the negative impacts on job satisfaction, leisure time satisfaction and mental health. People are only likely to continue to accept that a long commute is a price to pay if it is unavoidable and a social norm.

The Commuting & Wellbeing study was funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) (Grant Number ES/N012429/1). The project was led by Dr Kiron Chatterjee at the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) and ran for eighteen months from February 2016 to July 2017. A summary report from the study is available athttps://travelbehaviour.com/outputs-commuting-wellbeing/

THE HEALTH CONDITION KILLING BRITS’ CONFIDENCE

Posted by on Oct 23, 2017 in Blog, Public Health | 0 comments

  • Over 1.8 million people in UK have it, but two in five people (43%) with psoriasis are afraid to go outside for fear of being judged
  • Over one in 10 won’t go on holiday (14%), or to the gym (14%) and more than one in 20 won’t go out to meet friends (7%), due to the physical and emotional impact of the debilitating condition
  • Furthermore, 50% of people admitted they feel embarrassed to talk about their lifelong battle with psoriasis and a quarter (26%) feel stuck in a helpless treatment loop with limited options

THE autoimmune skin condition that affects nearly one in 50 people in the UK[1] has knocked the nation’s confidence, according to new research.

In a poll by Philips Healthcare*, a shocking two in five people (43%) who live with psoriasis revealed the condition has lowered their self-esteem, put up a social barrier and stopped them from going outside.

The chronic disease – which appears as raised, red patches on the skin – is having such an emotional impact on Brits that more than one in 10 sufferers refuse to go on holiday (14%), or to the gym (14%) and more than one in 20 won’t go out to meet friends (7%).

In fact, 50% of people surveyed admitted they feel embarrassed to even talk about their psoriasis, while the majority (75%) simply turn to creams in hope of a quick fix.

Despite 60% of Brits currently suffering from or having suffered with a skin disease at some point during their lifetime[2], when visiting their GP, some of those with psoriasis revealed they feel stuck in a treatment loop (26%), not a priority (23%), frustrated (15%), ignored (16%) and believe their GP is clueless (14%).

Expert dermatologist, Professor Cherio said: ‘The poll highlights not only the social stigma of the condition, but also the limitations individuals feel when faced with treatment options. It is concerning that 1 in 10 have never tried anything at all and I can only assume this is due to a lack of awareness around psoriasis.

Studies continue to show that treating the disease is your best bet to improve your quality of life and reduce the risk of developing comorbidities[3].’

Prof. Dr. Matthias Born, Director Clinical & Scientific Affairs and Principal Scientist at Philips, says: ‘Psoriasis complicates millions of daily lives and disrupts countless relationships. For this reason, Philips Light Therapy team set out to create a world-first treatment for psoriasis sufferers to give them back control of the condition. Philips BlueControl enables users to manage symptoms at home and on the go.’

 Patients report mixed experience of Emergency Departments, as attendances soar.

Posted by on Oct 17, 2017 in Blog, NHS | 0 comments

 Patients report mixed experience of Emergency Departments, as attendances soar.

Today (17 October 2017) the Care Quality Commission (CQC) published the results of the Emergency Department Survey 2016; a nation-wide survey of more than 40,000 people who attended emergency and urgent care departments, which sought to understand their experiences. The results suggest that most patients have a positive experience when it comes to interactions with NHS doctors and nurses, despite a marked increase in the numbers attending NHS Emergency Departments in recent years. The years between 2005/6 and 2015/6 has seen an increase in emergency department attendance of 10%; this equates to over one million additional people attending the departments in 2016 than 2006.

The survey included people who attended one of 137 acute and specialist NHS trusts during September 2016, and is part of the National Patient Survey Programme (NPSP) managed by the Survey Coordination Centre, based at Picker. Despite the increasing number of attendees to emergency departments, 73% of patients said they definitely had enough time to discuss their condition with a doctor or nurse. In addition, 78% of these reported that their doctors and nurses listened to what they had to say. CEO of Picker, Chris Graham, said “The challenges facing emergency departments are well publicised. More people are attending, increasing the challenge of providing timely, effective care for every patient. Despite this, most patients report positive experiences, which stands as testament to the efforts of NHS staff working in busy departments.” “But there are mixed results for some areas of person-centred care that are important to patients: for example, only 69% of patients reported that their doctor or nurse explained the nature of their condition and treatment in a way that they could understand.” Three quarters (75%) of respondents “definitely” had confidence in their doctors and nurses, with a further 18% having confidence in them to a certain degree.

However, the survey highlighted issues that arise when patients leave the facilities; 30% of respondents weren’t given enough information about which danger signs of their condition or treatment to watch out for on returning home; and 37% were not given enough information about what side-effects of their medication they should watch out for. Furthermore, 45% of respondents stated that their home situation was not taken into account when they left the emergency department, and 34% were not informed as to when they could resume normal activities, such as driving. Chris Graham responded “Emergency departments fulfil an important role in healthcare. Firstly, they address the urgent needs of patients who present with a wide range of conditions, symptoms, and severity of needs. Equally, they have a role in directing patients on to other services for follow-up care and treatment: in some cases this will involve hospital admission, but in others patients may be referred back to GPs or on to other services.” “The importance of this co-ordinating role cannot be understated, because it impacts demand and pressure felt throughout the system – including in emergency departments themselves. It is therefore worrying to see poorer results for people’s experiences of discharge from emergency departments. Patients who leave without awareness of potential danger signals to watch for, or understanding what to do if they have problems, are at risk of poorer health outcomes and requiring further unplanned care.” “Improving people’s experiences of leaving emergency departments should be a priority, particularly as services prepare to face the pressures of another busy winter.”

New study in The BMJ: Weight Watchers Diabetes Prevention Programme significantly reduces risk of Type 2 diabetes

Posted by on Oct 17, 2017 in Blog, Public Health | 0 comments

 A new, 1 year UK-based study published today (Tuesday 17th October) in The BMJ, Open Diabetes and Research and Care indicates that overweight and obese adults at risk of developing type 2 diabetes who were referred to Weight Watchers®, the world’s leading community based weight management provider, lost significantly more weight and saw greater reductions in their blood sugar levels than the level defined as success recommended by Public Health England (PHE).

And what’s more, close to 80% of eligible patients offered the programme, participated, demonstrating very high engagement levels.

The independent research, commissioned by the London Borough of Bromley Local Authority, looked at whether an augmented Diabetes Prevention Programme (DPP) delivered by Weight Watchers using a primary care referral pathway could reduce the progression of type 2 diabetes in those at risk of developing the disease.

166 patients were referred to Weight Watchers DPP from 14 GP practices across Bromley. Patients were offered the programme, which included a special welcome session followed by Weight Watchers meetings for 48 weeks, supported by trained Coach and specific curriculum. This real world study was conducted by Carolyn Piper and Dr. Agnes Marossy in the Public Health department at the London Borough of Bromley Local Authority, Zoe Griffiths, Head of Programme and Public Health, Weight Watchers UK and Dr. Amanda Adegboye at the University of Westminster.

79% of eligible patients engaged in the programme. At 12 months, those who had attended the welcome session and started attending meetings (114) achieved a mean reduction in HbA1c (glycated haemoglobin) of 2.84mmol/mol (from 43.42 +1.28 to 40.58 +3.41). Of those with comparable data, 49% returned to normoglycaemia (were no longer at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes) and a further 20% significantly reduced their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. This was associated with a mean weight reduction of 10kg and a mean reduction in BMI of 3.2kg/m2 (from 35.5kg/m2 +5.4 to 32.3kg/m2 +5.2) as well as increases in physical activity.

The researchers concluded that offering a primary care referral route partnered with Weight Watchers DPP can considerably reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.

This evidence comes as type 2 diabetes, both incidence and prevalence in the UK is rising dramatically. Type 2 diabetes is closely linked to obesity and can therefore be reversed by weight loss.

Lead author Carolyn Piper Public Health Manager at the London Borough of Bromley Local Authority says: “Type 2 diabetes is one of the most significant public health challenges of our time. A new diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is made every two minutes in the UK with the risk of developing the disease significantly influenced by our lifestyles. It’s within our power to reverse the ever increasing tide of type 2 diabetes with the right education and support. We undertook this research in the real world to show that the disease can easily be reversed using existing resources and providers in a more effective way at a time when budgets are being squeezed.”

Zoe Griffiths, Head of Programme and Public Health, Weight Watchers UK adds: “The evidence for reducing type 2 diabetes is well established but what this study demonstrates is how to implement prevention programmes in the real world utilising existing referral pathways and offering programmes that people want to go to. These real world outcomes echo and build on evidence of the effectiveness of this programme, found in a randomised controlled trial1 published in the American Journal of Public Health which compared Weight Watchers DPP to standard care.

“The lifestyle changes achieved in the intervention, measured by weight loss, translated into considerable reductions in diabetes risk, with an immediate and significant public health impact. Through GPs referring at risk patients to a programme that provides intense support via weekly meetings, digital tools including an app, a vibrant online community and specific curriculum, more effective and efficient lifestyle change can be achieved than interventions delivered by primary care alone.

“We’d welcome the opportunity to work with Public Health England as part of the Healthier You: NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme rollout. Close to 80% of eligible patients who were offered the Weight Watchers DPP programme engaged, illustrating the significant scale that could be achieved by working together.”

Think tank welcomes ‘common sense approach that will save lives this winter’

Posted by on Oct 13, 2017 in Blog, Public Health | 0 comments

Think tank welcomes ‘common sense approach that will save lives this winter’
Responding to NHS England, Public Health England, the Department of Health and NHS Improvement’s announcement that employers of social care workers will no longer need to pay to have their employees vaccinated against the flu, the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) has praised the long-called for decision.

Whilst NHS staff were already offered the vaccination for free to protect patients and the public, the Government recommended that social care workers were immunised but asked employers of social care workers to pay for the vaccine. The ILC-UK has long highlighted the need to fund the vaccine for social care workers, to protect the extremely vulnerable people under their care.

The flu epidemic in care homes in Wigan last winter, which lead to thirty cases of flu, eight deaths, and Wigan Infirmary and the North West Ambulance Service facing additional pressures, is a case study of the toll that low uptake of flu vaccination among care home staff can have on residents and the NHS.

However, the ILC-UK is also urging the Government to ensure that domiciliary care workers are also reimbursed for the immunisation, so that they can protect the people they care for from influenza this winter.

David Sinclair, Director of the International Longevity Centre – UK said:

‘Influenza is a serious illness which does kill.

For years the ILC-UK highlighted that it made little sense to offer NHS staff the vaccination for free, whilst asking employers of social care workers to pay for the jab, as their staff also care for the most vulnerable people in our society.

Protecting older people through offering the flu vaccine to social care workers free of charge is a common sense approach that will save lives this winter. However, we are urging the Government to go further and ensure that domiciliary care workers are reimbursed when they receive the vaccine on the high street so that they too can protect the people under their care’.