The “Healthier in the EU” website (www.healthierin.eu) launched on March 4th, announces the campaign’s advisory board, team, mission, blog pieces and provides dozens of supporting statements and signatures from leading UK health professionals.

Healthier in the EU (“Healthier IN” for short) is a grassroots campaign set up to raise the voice of UK health professionals, carers, patients and researchers in the EU referendum debate.

The advisory board comprises some of the UK’s top names in healthcare – from nursing to health researchers and patients:

John Bowis, former Minister of Health (1992-1996)

Anne Marie Rafferty, the first Professor of Nursing Policy in the UK

Lord Nigel Crisp, former Chief Executive of the NHS in England (2000-2006)

Robert Johnstone, chair of Access Matters, a pan disability consultancy

Dr Clare Gerada, former Chair of the Council of the Royal College of General Practitioners

Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief of The Lancet

Dame Glenis Willmott, MEP (Labour), led the European Parliament work on Clinical Trials legislation

Dr Charles Tannock, MEP (Conservative), member of the European Cancer Patient Coalition

Sir Simon Wessely, President of Royal College of Psychiatrists

Tamara Hervey, Professor of EU Law at the University of Sheffield

Kate Bushby, Clinical Academic Professor at Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals

Sir Harry Burns, Professor of Global Public Health at Strathclyde University.

Professor Sir Ian Gilmore, past-president of the Royal College of Physicians (RCP)

Sir Andy Haines, Professor of Public Health and Primary Care at the the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

The campaign’s message is that the EU allows the UK to pool resources with our closest neighbours to tackle important issues from public health (air pollution, tobacco, chemicals) to health innovation (medicines approvals, research networks) to large frameworks of healthcare (cross-border healthcare, international patients’ groups). These all have a direct effect on our wellbeing.

Health threats ignore borders, so we need to build international teams to match. Health innovation is best done at scale, so we need international teams to deliver. The EU is the right framework for meeting these challenges. Finally, our freedom of movement arrangement with the EU enables us to have the best mix of highly specialised skills, boosts our research capacity and helps to make our health service one of the most efficient in the world.

The EU is working. Staying in makes us stronger as a nation and healthier individually.

For further information contact: Dr Mike Galsworthy. mike_galsworthy@yahoo.co.uk